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NEWS : WED, NOV 11, 2015 at 10:30 AM

Low Resumes U.S. Headline Tour In Support of ‘Ones and Sixes’

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[Photo credit:  Zoran Orlic]


What’s this news from Low, you ask?  Well, the band have resumed their headlining US tour in support of Ones and Sixes, the group’s acclaimed new album. The trek continues tonight, Wednesday, November 11th at Minneapolis’ First Avenue, and goes through to Saturday, November 21st at Seattle’s Crocodile. Then in 2016, the group have scheduled a series of dates that begin January 15th in Anchorage, AK at Taproot and end February 13th in St. Louis at the Pageant. There are also two international festival dates to mention at this time: March 12th in Mexico City, MX at Festival NRML and June 11th in Kværndrup, DK at Heartland Festival. (see details below)


ICYMI:  Low recently premiered an official video for “Lies,” from Ones and Sixes, which was directed by Manuel Aragon (watch it here). The band also made its second appearance on Later with Jools Holland, performing Ones and Sixes highlights “What Part of Me” and “The Innocents.”  


And there’s more (particularly good) news of the charting kind:  Ones and Sixes earned Low the group’s first-ever U.K. Top 40 album, coming in at #35 on the official albums chart. The album also entered at #68 here in the U.S. on SoundScan’s Top Current Albums charts.


At Radio, Ones and Sixes peaked at #7 on the CMJ Top 200 chart.  In news of the on-air variety, the band have confirmed studio sessions at KCRW’s “Morning Becomes Eclectic” (November 16th), and have visited to WXPN’s “World Cafe” (“What Part of Me” & “No Comprende”), KCMP (view here), and more.


Ones and Sixes is also one of the best-reviewed albums of Low’s career with international acclaim from the likes of NPR Music, Paste, Rolling Stone, SPIN, Boston Globe, Pitchfork, Under the Radar, The Guardian, The Observer, DIY, Q, MOJO, Uncut, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, CLASH, The Sunday Times, Dusted, NOW,  and more. And the band are the current cover stars of MAGNET’s September issue, interviewed by Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon (view cover / read an excerpt of the story here).


Low’s Ones and Sixes is available for purchase from the Sub Pop Mega Mart, iTunes, Amazon, and Bandcamp. Now completely sold-out through megamart.subpop.com, the limited “Loser Edition” of the double-LP on yellow vinyl and packaged in a variant slipcase cover is only available from select independent stores and from the band themselves at upcoming tour dates (while supplies last). Has it been a while since you visited the Mega Mart?  Well, there are also two new T-shirt designs available both as individual items and as part of CD/LP bundles.


Tour Dates

Nov. 11 - Minneapolis, MN - First Avenue*

Nov. 12 – Omaha, NE – Reverb Lounge*

Nov. 13 - Denver, CO - Larimer Lounge*

Nov. 14 - Salt Lake City, UT - The Complex*

Nov. 16 - Los Angeles, CA - The Troubadour*

Nov. 18 - San Francisco, CA - Great American Music Hall*

Nov. 20 - Portland, OR - Doug Fir*

Nov. 21 - Seattle, WA - The Crocodile*

Jan. 15 - Anchorage, AK - Taproot

Jan. 30 - Evanston, IL - SPACE

Feb. 01 - Philadelphia, PA – Johnny Brenda’s

Feb. 02 - Baltimore, MD - Creative Alliance (Seated)

Feb. 03 - Carrboro, NC - Cat’s Cradle

Feb. 04 - Atlanta, GA - The Earl

Feb. 05 - Birmingham, AL - Saturn

Feb. 06 - New Orleans, LA - One Eyed Jacks

Feb. 08 - Houston, TX - Walter’s Downtown

Feb. 09 - Austin, TX - The Parish

Feb. 10 - Dallas, TX - The Kessler Theatre

Feb. 11 - Hot Springs, AR - Low Key Arts

Feb. 12 - Nashville, TN - City Winery

Feb. 13 - St. Louis, MO - Off Broadway

Mar. 12 - Mexico City, MX - Festival NRML

Jun. 11 - Kværndrup, DK - Heartland Festival

* w/ Andy Shauf

For up to date information on tickets please visit http://chairkickers.com/shows.


Posted by Rachel White

NEWS : WED, NOV 11, 2015 at 6:55 AM

Michael Azerrad vs. Jonathan Meiburg on ‘Jet Plane and Oxbow’

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Recently, Michael Azerrad (editor-in-chief of The Talkhouse and author of Our Band Could Be Your Life) spoke with Shearwater’s Jonathan Meiburg to discuss forthcoming album Jet Plane and Oxbow.  We think the ensuing conversation is pretty special, and so might you: 



Michael Azerrad vs. Jonathan Meiburg on Jet Plane and Oxbow


MICHAEL AZERRAD: Hello?

JONATHAN MEIBURG: Hi, Michael. 

MA: You know, I have to admit I miss not knowing who was calling when the phone rang.  I like clinging to the fiction that I don’t know who it is.

JM: It’s true.  “Hello” really used to be a question.  It’s strange to remember that time so clearly, since it already seems so far away!  The other day, I saw a list of New Year’s resolutions David Bowie published in 1980—one, by the way, was his intention to be 67 years old by 1990.

MA: I happen to be pretty good at arithmetic and I could have told him that wasn’t going to happen.

JM:—but the one that really struck me was “to own a print of Eraserhead.”  Not so much because it’s Eraserhead, but because the idea of owning a personal copy of a cult film, that you could watch anytime you wanted, still seemed extravagant then.  Even for someone who liked being ahead of his time.

MA: He was on Broadway back then, wasn’t he, playing the Elephant Man?  That would have been about the time Scary Monsters came out, I guess.

JM: You were living in New York then?

MA: Yes.  It was a hairier place then, but it was also a great time for New York music.  I’m not saying that out of nostalgia, by the way—I think now’s a great time for New York music too.  But it was just different then.  Now there’s this idea that punk was the only ‘real’ thing happening then, the CBGB thing, or No Wave—and that was exciting, it was great—but there were all kinds of other musical avenues opening up too, around then.  I’m thinking about how in the summers there were these great, sort of viral hits you’d hear all over the place, booming out of cars and boomboxes and bodegas, and some of them were really rough and ready, homemade things. Like Frankie Smith’s “Double Dutch Bus”—you ever hear that one?

JM: “Gimme a HOOOO if you got your funky bus fare!”

MA: Yeah! There was a wonderfully oddball, slapdash feeling to a lot of it, even some big records.  I think I still have one of the straw hillbilly hats they used in the video for Malcolm McLaren’s “Buffalo Gals” buried in my closet.  I wore it home on the subway and I heard this one older gentleman say to his friend, “Now that’s a real homeboy hat.”

JM: Speaking of “Buffalo Gals” and double dutch—I was listening to McLaren’s “Double Dutch” the other day and was blown away by what a wild mashup that song is.  The Mahotella Queens, the disco strings, the handclaps, the rope-whooshing sounds, and Malcolm sort of awkwardly sing-talking his way over the top of it with total, oblivious confidence.

MA: Confidence will get you everywhere.

JM: It’s got a great video, too. I like it better than Graceland

MA: Me too.  Hey, aren’t we supposed to be talking about your record?

JM: Ha, yes! But I think the early 1980s are a good place to start from, in a way.  When I was writing the songs I was listening to a lot of records from around that time—like Scary Monsters, which you mentioned, or My Life In the Bush of Ghosts, or Big Science, or Peter Gabriel’s Melt record, or PiL’s Metal Box.

MA: I definitely heard all those in this record—also Remain in Light and Talk Talk’s The Colour of Spring.  But no offense, I don’t actually hear any Metal Box.

JM: Danny wasn’t going to let me go there, which is probably a good thing.  That’s such a mesmerizing album though. I snuck in a lyrical nod to it in one of the songs. 

MA: Maybe that’s part of what I like about your record. It’s certainly not a period re-creation, but it has a resonance, for me, with that time.  It looks back, but it also looks forward.  

JM: You ever see that performance PiL did on American Bandstand?  Where they barely even pretended to play “Poptones” and started running around the studio, and Dick Clark was like, “who’s this asshole?”

MA: When it was broadcast!  Back then you had to be paying attention or you missed everything.  But why that time?  Why those records?  It’s not like nostalgia for your teenage years. More like nostalgia for my teenage years.

JM: Well—I like thinking about what the sounds of that time must have meant in context.  They definitely give me the sense of being at a crossroads, of a revolution brewing just offstage, and I think that’s at least in part because digital recording gear was just starting to hit its stride: Eventide harmonizers, Linn drums, early samplers and delays—stuff that must have seemed like the coastline of an exciting new world, inhabited by new species of music.  But MIDI hadn’t reared its head yet, or some of the other gadgets that started to make everything so crispy and mechanical-sounding a few years later. You still needed to have musicians who could play, and listen.  Is any of this actually true, by the way, or am I just projecting?

MA: It’s funny, because I was just thinking that at the time lots of people were saying that the stuff you’re talking about meant that musicians didn’t have to listen or know how to play.  Now they say that about laptop music.  Plus ça change… but I take it that the technology you’re talking about played an important role in Jet Plane and Oxbow

JM: Danny, who I mentioned, Danny Reisch, produced and engineered the record. We’ve worked together for the past couple of years—he also played drums on our tours—and we’ve gotten really dialed in to each other’s strengths and flaws, so there’s a lot we don’t need to explain to each other.  But we started this record by setting some ground rules, and one of them was to lean as much as we could on instruments and gear from that era, as long we didn’t veer off into pastiche.

MA: Such as?

JM: Rototoms!

MA: Oh, God. Possibly the most maligned percussion instrument in musical history.  Although they were somewhat redeemed by their appearance on Wazmo Nariz’s classic 1979 single “Checking Out the Checkout Girl.”

JM: Believe me, I was skeptical, too—but it turns out they can be great with the right drummer, especially if you put fiber-skin heads on them and not those plastic ones they come with.  I also mostly played a strat this time instead of the older hollow-body I used on the last few albums, and I fell in love with a beautiful little synth called a Korg Lambda; it’s the first sound you hear on the record. We also spent some time doing overdubs and treatments with Brian Reitzell in LA.  He mostly does film scores, but also he used to play drums for Air and Redd Kross.

MA: Now, that’s what I call a versatile drummer.

JM: I think he enjoyed working on something that wasn’t tracked to picture.  But he reveres that era of recording we’re talking about, and a bit further back, too; he got me into Takemitsu and that mind-bending Tangerine Dream record Zeit.  With Brian, we were trying to nudge the record toward that world, toward that kind of beauty, and menace. 

MA: ‘Menace’ is an apt word. There was certainly a lot of it in the air in 1980. Carter reinstated the draft, Reagan got elected, John Lennon got shot, and New York City was a pretty scary place.  Everybody thought Reagan was going to start World War III.  Did you know where the fallout shelter was in your school?

JM:  I did.  And thinking back, I guess Baltimore would have been vaporized along with DC if the Soviets nuked us, so the end would have been quick for my first-grade class, no matter where we cowered in the building!  But I also think of it as a time—I mean, these are really early memories, but they’re deeply embedded—I remember a feeling that technology was about to change everything about life as we knew it. Voyager was sending back pictures of Jupiter and Saturn.  The Empire Strikes Back was in the theaters, and then E.T. made all my friends want a Speak and Spell.  We were fascinated by computers, but we didn’t really know what they were, so they seemed capable of anything.  Remember Superman III, where Richard Pryor builds an evil computer that wants to destroy the world?

MA: In retrospect, that’s a visionary film about cyber-terrorism.  Now computers actually are capable of anything.

JM:  Yeah—Bowie could stick a few hi-res copies of Eraserhead on a thumb drive and toss it in his sock drawer. But maybe what appeals to me most about looking back to that era is that I feel like we’re in a parallel time now. Technology seems magical again in the way it did when I was a little kid, but it’s also scarier than ever.  People can tinker with the actual DNA of living things.  The NSA can watch drone feeds of your house on their lunch breaks.  Soldiers in the Nevada desert can kill people on the other side of the world by pressing a button.  It’s hard to tell where legitimate concern ends and paranoia begins.

MA:  And legitimate concerns are routinely denounced as paranoia. You’re right about the parallels with this time—for instance, the Russians are making an encore performance as international heavies.  And as far as technology goes—have you seen the promos for that Soylent stuff? 

JM: “What if you never had to worry about food again”?

MA: I see things like that and I think: we are doomed.

JM: Me too.  And I’d be lying if I said that feeling wasn’t there in the record.  But I was also trying to look beyond it, because in the end all that dread and anxiety only gets you so far; the song “Backchannels” is sort of an attempt to meet that head-on.  Not to get too cosmic about it, but, you know, eventually the sun will expand till it’s right where you and I are sitting, no matter what we do or don’t do, and at least it’s better to be alive at the end than after the end, you know?  The guy who did the neon work for the cover said that people ask him all the time if he worries about working in a dying medium—and he said, “I’m like, well, I’m also in this dying body, in a dying city, on a dying planet...”

[both laugh]

MA: Why are we laughing…

JM: Why are we laughing about this?  I know! I guess sometimes the truth is like a hit of oxygen, or maybe nitrous, even when it’s grim.  But that’s just the backdrop to life; it’s our fantasies that show you who we really are.  I remember watching the Baltimore Aquarium being built back when I was a kid, this giant, earthbound space station of concrete and neon and glass, full of escalators and dark passageways and glowing fish, and the shining pyramid on top with a rain forest in it, and thinking this is the future!  I was so excited about growing up in that future, you know?

MA: Now it’s yesterday’s future. 

JM: Just like today’s will be tomorrow.  Did you ever see Arthur Russell perform, by the way?

MA: No. It was just as possible to miss great stuff then as it is now.    

JM: Are you saying that to make me feel better?

MA:  Maybe!  My guess is fewer people will miss this record than you might think.  Speaking for myself, I don’t think I’ve ever heard you sound so extroverted—I can see you singing these songs to stadiums full of people, with one foot up on the monitor. 

JM: Is that a good thing?

MA: In this context, yeah.  I felt like you were reaching out with this record, making something really big, in a way I hadn’t quite heard from you before.  As the kids would say, it’s “epic.” 

JM:  I think I have to make peace with that word.  As long as it means “the record offers you a sonic landscape that rewards repeat listens”, which is something I’m always striving for, I’m OK with it. This one definitely has some of my proudest recorded moments, like that solo at the end of “Filaments”.

MA: What is that, by the way?

JM: It’s a guitar. I promise!

MA: It’s very Adrian Belew.  Of all these songs, “Quiet Americans” sounds most like a hit to me, or your version of a hit, more than any other Shearwater song I’ve heard.  It’s hard for me to get it out of my head.  And I think I know what it means, but what does it mean to you?

JM: My idea for Jet Plane and Oxbow was to try to make a protest record that wasn’t dumb or preachy.  Which was sometimes hard to reconcile with how much fun it was to do!  But the more grand or triumphant the songs sounded, the more conflicted the lyrics became, which I really liked. I listened to it the other day for the first time since we mastered it and it reminded me of a breakup letter—the kind that’s furious and tender at the same time, because it’s written with love.

MA: Wow, who are you breaking up with?

JM:  Good question…the United States, I guess, though that sounds ridiculous when I say it out loud.  Maybe the idea of the United States.  Some of the things we like to tell ourselves about ourselves.  I’m as guilty of that as the next person, by the way; I’m not saying I’m the guy who sees it all clearly.  I don’t know if anybody really can.

MA [in his best Bowie]:  “I’m afraid of Americans!” But it can’t really be a breakup, can it?  Because in a breakup you walk away, and you’re not leaving… are you?

JM:  That’s the thing.  I can’t stop being an American, even when it makes my skin crawl.  I also can’t help loving it here, even though I hate it sometimes, too. And I don’t think I’m the only one here who feels like this.  So in the end, I guess, the record felt like a way for me to send out a little beacon that just says “You’re not alone.”  In the tense, polarized, tech-addled—but still very beautiful—world we’re in, I don’t think anyone can hear that enough.

- - - - -

Listen to single “Quiet Americans,” and preorder Shearwater’s upcoming Jet Plane and Oxbow right over here.


Posted by Rachel White

NEWS : FRI, NOV 6, 2015 at 4:00 AM

Join Us For The 4th Annual ‘SMooCH’ Benefit Show for Children’s Hospital (UPDATED)

Smooch benefit logo3

This coming December 5th at Seattle’s Showbox Theatre at The Market, Sub Pop joins forces with KEXP in support of the 4th Annual SMooCH (Seattle Musicians for Children’s Hospital) Benefit.  


The first two acts on the bill were announced Nov. 6th - The Afghan Whigs and Sir Mix-A-Lot.

JUST ADDED:  Mary Lambert is now on the bill!

This amazing event sells out every year, so don’t sleep!   Get your tickets here: http://www.showboxpresents.com/events/detail/294340.

VIP and GA tickets are still available, and 100% of all proceeds benefit the Seattle Children’s Hospital Uncompensated Care Fund


SMooCH was founded by Pete and Brandy Nordstrom, and contributes to an essential program that fulfills Children’s founding promise to provide care to every infant, child and teen in Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho who needs their help — regardless of insurance coverage or financial circumstances. 


If you can’t attend, please consider donating to the cause so families are able to care for their sick child and not worry about whether they’ll have to choose between their child’s health and their financial health.  

Thank for helping us support this great cause!


Posted by Rachel White

NEWS : MON, NOV 2, 2015 at 12:00 AM

Selective Listening: Notes from the desk of the General Manager… (November, 2015)

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Little-known fact: In this very building, I am only one of TWO high-powered record label bigwigs with the title General Manager. And my vain interest in keeping this little-known fact little-known is, it turns out, only outweighed by my interest in convincing someone else to take Selective Listening out for a spin this month. And so, the following notes from the desk of the very competent and congenial Sarah Moody, the OTHER General Manager, up/down/over at Hardly Art Records!


Generally Managing Managers Generally

The view outside is clouded and grey as I type this missive from the penthouse of 4th and Lenora, high atop the salty streets of downtown Seattle. From the stunning windowed heights of our office (a collaboration with Renzo Piano, if you must know), we can truly see it all. To the North: the lauded Space Needle; to the South: Mount Rainier, off in the distance; to the East, the mighty Cascade mountain range; and to the West, the expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Closer to home, however, I can peer over the lip of our rooftop garden into the other proverbial garden of downtown: the parking lot behind our office, filled with a variety of activity that seems to mine only the darkest depths of the human condition. On any given day, you might be fortunate enough to spot its activity in full bloom (if you will), which could include but not be limited to: people shooting up, smoking crack, peddling wares, screaming about this or that, and, most recently, actively shitting next to cars. Also below our modern belfry are the offices of Sub Pop Records. (They might have you believe we have been relegated to the second floor of this same building—don’t be fooled by their trickery.)

Now then, I suppose I should set aside my robe and smoking pipe and tell you who is typing here. Much like my esteemed colleague and your usual Selective Listening author, Chris Jacobs, I too manage a vast swath of employees who work and toil in the name of music. All two of them. But I am pleased to report that they are two of the most highly coveted demographic: the elusive Millenial Male. What do they have to say about this fact? Let’s take a visit to their corner offices and find out.

Jason, Publicist: We live and breathe content. It is all about CONTENT. <types furiously>

Matt, Sales and Digital Media: I’m just glad I’m not working at Sub Pop. <dons sunglasses>

Me, General Manager: You are both beautiful snowflakes and I am so proud of you. <returns feet to ottoman>

What month is it, anyway? November? Great. Here’s what we have coming up in November:

Suffice to say it has been a good year for the Hardly Art empire, which just wrapped last month with the most recent release from Protomartyr, The Agent IntellectPerhaps you have heard of it? They will take leave from Detroit and escape the US paparazzi by spending their November on tour overseas.

The wondrous troupe of Shannon and the Clams, meanwhile, just wrapped a US tour with Shopping and will be headed overseas later this month in support of their latest, Gone by the Dawn. (You sense a theme here?)

Magical feminists (“Who isn’t a feminist these days?!” “I know!”) Chastity Belt are on the road again in support of their acclaimed sophomore effort, Time to Go Home, including a number of shows opening for Death Cab for Cutie. Seattle party? I’d say so.

La Luz are doing nothing in November but resting on their laurels (I hope) as they just wrapped a 12-week tour between the US and Europe in support of Weirdo Shrine. That is, in two words, pretty baller.

If you are looking to extend your celebration of Halloween, might we suggest Holographic Violence by local brooders Grave Babies? Or if you need a soundtrack to your worldly toke, perhaps try I Want to Grow Up by Colleen Green? “Another hit record?!” you ask. We know, we know. We have it all for you, here at our lavish HQ.

As if that wasn’t enough, we’ve gone ahead and compiled a chart-topping single from each of the above releases (and a few more) into an inaugural sampler. Not only a sampler, a real life CD SAMPLER. They’ll be available at finer record stores across the pond, as well as with all orders placed with the fine web store of hardlyart.com, from now until they run out. We encourage you to hunker down with it as you prepare to bundle up for winter.

While other labels may claim to strive for World Domination, we here at Hardly Art merely aim for Sub Pop Domination. After the year that was 2015, I daresay we are close. While we wait out the final verdict, below you will find a brief soundtrack to our days of endless champagne and caviar. I think I can… manage that.  (*rimshot*)


Posted by Chris Jacobs

NEWS : FRI, OCT 30, 2015 at 3:45 AM

Reissue, Repress, Rejoice!: Built to Spill’s ‘There’s Nothing Wrong With Love’ & Ugly Casanova’s ‘Sharpen Your Teeth are out on vinyl

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Built to Spill’s There’s Nothing Wrong With Love and Ugly Casanova’s Sharpen Your Teeth are now available on vinyl from Sub Pop.


Built to Spill’s There’s Nothing Wrong With Love is the second full-length album released by legendary indie rock band Built to Spill. (stream the album here) It was originally released September 13, 1994 on the Up Records label. The line-up for the album was Doug Martsch, bassist Brett Nelson, and drummer Andy Capps, with Phil Ek producing. The album features the enduring singles “In the Morning,” “Car,” and “Distopian Dream Girl.”

Pitchfork recently reviewed There’s Nothing Wrong With Love, giving the album “Best New Reissue,” and had this to say: “With its focus on childhood, the nature of existence, and the search for meaning, it’s possible to hear There’s Nothing Wrong With Love in the terms of  “What if there was another universe in my fingernail?” - style stoner dorm-room philosophy. But Martsch’s open heart keeps you on his side…To borrow one last line from “Car”, on this album Martsch remembered when he wanted to see “movies of his dreams.” For the vast majority of us that wish is never fulfilled, but There’s Nothing Wrong With Love is a celebration of the desire itself, the vulnerability that comes with allowing yourself to imagine possibility (see October 23rd review).


Sharpen Your Teeth is the underground classic and lone offering from Ugly Casanova.  (stream the album here)  The long, out-of-print vinyl edition will come with the original 13 track album and 4 bonus songs: “Babies Clean Conscience,” “Diggin Holes,” “Roads to Go to Roads to Go to…“ (which were available as limited edition singles around the album’s release); And the unreleased “They Devised A Plan to Fuck Forever,” recorded during the Sharpen Your Teeth sessions.  The album, which was co-produced by Brian Deck and Isaac Brock at Glacial Pace Studios (Oregon), features guest appearances from John Orth (Holopaw), Tim Rutili (Califone, Red Red Meat), Pall Jenkins (The Black Heart Procession), and a handful of like-minded collaborators.

Ugly Casanova is Isaac Brock, of Modest Mouse. Or, possibly, it is a mysterious savant named Edgar Graham, who imposed himself on Modest Mouse at the Denver show of the band’s 1998 tour, introduced himself as Ugly Casanova, and, through a haze of unnerving instability, shared some rough songs with the band. His songs, though delivered hesitantly… shamefully, even… displayed unmistakable talent. By the end of Modest Mouse’s tour, Casanova, with much reluctance, was persuaded to record some of these songs and hand them over to record labels for issue as singles or parts of compilations. Predictably, immediately after he had done so, he disappeared (read more about Ugly Casanova here).



Built to Spill’s There’s Nothing Wrong With Love and Ugly Casanova’s Sharpen Your Teeth are now available for purchase through Sub Pop Mega Mart and fine independent retailers everywhere.


Built to Spill

There’s Nothing Wrong With Love

Tracklisting:

1. In the Morning

2. Reasons

3. Big Dipper

4. Car

5. Fling

6. Cleo

7. The Source

8. Twin Falls

9. Some

10. Distopian Dream Girl

11. Israel’s Song

12. Stab


Ugly Casanova

Sharpen Your Teeth

Vinyl tracklisting

1. Barnacles

2. Spilled Milk Factory

3. Parasites

4. Hotcha Girls

5. (no song)

6. Diamonds On the Face of Evil

7. Cat Faces

8. Ice On the Sheets

9. Bee Sting

10. Pacifico

11. Smoke Like Ribbons

12. Things I Don’t Remember

13. So Long to the Holidays

14. Babies Clean Conscience*

15. Diggin Holes*

16. They Devised a Plan to Fuck Forever*

17. Roads to Go to Roads to Go to…*



Posted by Rachel White